CrossoverLexus31% by Neofiliac Team56% by External Reviewers

Lexus NX (AZ10)

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Product Overview

Lexus NX (chassis code AZ10) is a compact crossover in production from 2014 to 2021. It was available with a range of inline-4 engines that displaced 2.0 to 2.5 liters.
The NX was broadly available with a 2.5L petrol hybrid drivetrain marketed as NX 300h and a 2.0L turbocharged petrol drivetrain marketed initially as NX 200t but "upgraded" to NX 300 after the minor facelift in 2017.
This facelift hardly touched on the body panels, with the most notable difference being the appearance around the front bumper.

Ratings

What we found

Neofiliac score 31%
Pros
  • Reliable engines
  • Low fuel consumption
Cons
  • No powerful engine options
  • Bland design
  • Can't go offroad
  • Not much space inside
  • Poor handling

What external reviewers found

External score 56%
Pros
  • Decent performance
  • Impressive cross-country pace
  • Decent infotainment system
  • Good standard equipment
Cons
  • Poor infotainment
  • Lack of space in the boot
  • Poor towing capacity
  • Lacks petrol or hybrid power
  • Lacklustre rear-seat tech
  • Remote touch pad controller is distracting to use

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Price Comparison

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Specifications

Variants shown:
200t
200t AWD
300
300 AWD
300h
300h AWD

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External Reviews

autocar[1]

Reviewer score 42% (normalized by Neofiliac)
Reviewers from autocar have found:
Lexus has axed the 194bhp 2.0-litre turbocharged NX200t for 2018, leaving the hybrid 300h tested here as the only option. The interior remains a highlight, even if the instrument dials still sit unusually low and the enlarged infotainment screen, now 10.3in, sits awkwardly atop of the dash. In low-speed traffic the NX300h remains a cut above its un-electrified rivals thanks to ability to glide off the mark silently.
Pros
  • Powerful hybrid powertrain
  • Impressive cross-country pace
Cons
  • Raucous under acceleration
  • Poor infotainment

autoexpress[2]

Reviewer score 60% (normalized by Neofiliac)
Reviewers from autoexpress have found:
The NX is 4,630mm long, 1,845mm wide and 1,645mm tall. That makes it almost exactly as long as the Audi Q5. It's a strict five-seater, but thanks to the sloping roofline, occupants in the back of the NX don't get as much headroom as in a BMW X3. Boot capacity stands at a rather cramped 475 litres, although that can be extended to 1,520 litres by lowering the split-folding rear seat. The NX stands out with a usefully wide boot opening and a totally flat load area.
Pros
  • Low running costs
  • Good standard equipment
  • Decent infotainment system
Cons
  • Lacks petrol or hybrid power
  • Poor towing capacity

carmagazine[3]

Reviewer score 59% (normalized by Neofiliac)
Reviewers from carmagazine have found:
Most expensive NX overall, as the NX200t is only available in F-Sport specification. The 235bhp NX turbo scampers 0-62mph in 7.1sec – a whole 2.1 sec faster than the 220bhp Lexus NX hybrid's 9.2sec time. With the transmission set to manual and keen to paddleshift at every reasonable command, this is no Porsche Macan but it shows plenty of promise.
Pros
  • Fantastic fuel economy
  • Lots of standard equipment
Cons
  • Only available in F-Sport

pcmag[4]

Reviewer score 69% (normalized by Neofiliac)
Reviewers from pcmag have found:
The all-wheel-drive NX 300h uses Lexus' E-Four system to run the rear wheels with a second electric motor. Between the powertrain and regenerative braking, it provides best-in-class fuel efficiency at an estimated 31mph combined. We found the large display layout and design easy to learn, but the remote touch pad controller is distracting to use while driving.
Pros
  • Best-in-class fuel efficiency
  • Responsive steering
  • Comfortable ride
Cons
  • Remote touch pad controller is distracting to use

References

  1. ^ Lexus NX300h 2018 review. [autocar].
  2. ^ Lexus NX review. [autoexpress].
  3. ^ Lexus NX200t (2015) review. [carmagazine].
  4. ^ 2020 Lexus NX 300h Review. [pcmag].

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