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ROG Zenith II Extreme Review Rundown

ASUS | Published on 13 Apr 2021 | Written by Dr Jiulin Teng w/ Neosummarizer

Overview

Photo of ROG Zenith II Extreme
  • 16-phase power delivery for the CPU
  • Supports up to 256 GB of DDR4-4733
  • ROG DIMM.2 module with heatsink
  • High price for an AMD Ryzen 3rd generation CPU

Summary

The ROG Zenith II Extreme looks to set the standard for enthusiasts on AMD's new high-end desktop platform. With a 16-phase power delivery for the CPU and a LiveDash 1.77'' OLED color screen, the board is very competitive with other TRX40 models. The motherboard has plenty of connectivity options with four full-length PCIe 4.0 slots which operate at x16/x8/x16/X8.
This rundown provides our analysis on 8 third-party reviews. The sentiment scores, summaries, and key takeaways that we select are based on these reviews and may differ from the original publication.

Rundown

anandtech[1]

Sentiment Score[*] 84%
Reviewers from Anandtech have found the following[***]:
ASUS ROG Zenith II Extreme is the second coming of the Zenith for AMD with the previous version designed for the X399 chipset. The board is designed to maximise performance with AMD's Threadripper 3000 processors. It does run with a slightly higher power draw than other models, but with a LiveDash 1.7" OLED screen, plenty of integrated RGB, and extra cooling fans for the power delivery, this is to be expected.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • 16-phase power delivery for AMD's TRX40 chipset
  • Supports up to 256 GB of DDR4-4733 in quad-channel mode
  • ROG Armoury Crate includes drivers and software
Cons[**]
  • Only one PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 slot

pcmag[2]

Sentiment Score[*] 86%
Reviewers from Pcmag have found the following[***]:
Asus' $849.99 ROG Zenith II Extreme is the company's prime-time motherboard for AMD's new third-generation TRX40 Threadripper processors. The E-ATX motherboard's massive weight is hinted at by the large heatsinks over the chipset, M.2 slots, and power circuitry. The board features 16 power stages that are connected via a heatpipe and actively cooled by a pair of small fans.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Sleek, high-end design
  • Lots of M.2 slots
  • ROG DIMM.2 module hardware
Cons[**]
  • Placing ports on the back of the board can be awkward

tomshardware[3]

Sentiment Score[*] 78%
Reviewers from Tomshardware have found the following[***]:
Asus' original Zenith II Extreme seemed like one of the best TRX40 models when we tested it. The new board is fitted with Infineon TDA21490 90A parts. Audio is provided from two onboard USB adapters using Asus's version of the ALC1220 codec.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Better-optimized MOSFETs for extreme overclocking
  • Better-than-average CPU performance
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

tomshardware[4]

Sentiment Score[*] 79%
Reviewers from Tomshardware have found the following[***]:
The ROG Zenith II Extreme costs considerabley more at $850. The OLED display is also quite a bit larger than that of the Zenith Extreme Alpha. Additional high-profile features include a two-drive M.2 riser card, a machined aluminum case badge.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Two-drive M.2 riser card
  • SATA-style power inlet
  • USB-C port disables two dual-port MOSFETs
Cons[**]
  • Lacks voltage detection points

references

  1. 1. ^ The ASUS ROG Zenith II Extreme TRX40 Motherboard Review: The Second Coming. Anandtech. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  2. 2. ^ Asus ROG Zenith II Extreme Review. Pcmag. 2020-03-23. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  3. 3. ^ Asus ROG Zenith II Extreme Alpha Review: More Overkill?. Tomshardware. 2020-04-13. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  4. 4. ^ Asus ROG Zenith II Extreme TRX40 Review: Premium Board at a Premium Price. Tomshardware. 2020-01-01. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  5. *. Neoscore is our sentiment analyzer based on natural language processing (NLP). Scaled in the range of 0 to 100, Neoscore eliminates scoring biases from each publisher; it likely differs from the publisher's own rating, if available, as a result.
  6. **. Neoanalyzer is our summarizer based on NLP. It identifies key takeaways from each third-party review. The takeaways that it produces likely differ from the publisher's own bullets points, if available, as a result.
  7. ***. Neosummarizer is based on NLP. It extracts summaries from third-party reviews. It likely that these summaries differ from the publisher's own, if available.

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