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Audi e-tron GT Review Rundown

Audi | Published on 22 Mar 2021 | Last Edited on 13 May 2021 | Written by Dr Jiulin Teng w/ Neosummarizer

Overview

Photo of Audi e-tron GT
  • Impressive power output for a four-door
  • Lots of physical buttons
  • Not as powerful as the Taycan Turbo

Summary

The first electric vehicle to wear Audi Sport's coveted RS badge, the e-tron GT shares in effect all of its componentry with the Porsche Taycan. While the Taycan is billed as a high-performance saloon, Audi is making a point of difference by pitching the e-tron GT as exactly that: a Grand Tourer.
This rundown provides our analysis on 8 third-party reviews. The sentiment scores, summaries, and key takeaways that we select are based on these reviews and may differ from the original publication.

Rundown

autocar[1]

Sentiment Score[*] 72%
Reviewers from Autocar have found the following[***]:
The new Audi E-tron GT Quattro shares a lot of underpinnings with the Porsche Taycan. There's a 93.4kWh total capacity battery with a 83.7kWh usable section, making a 298-mile range. One motor at the rear, another at the front, four-wheel drive and a two-speed gearbox.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Lots of underpinnings
  • Lots of fun to drive
  • Good standard equipment
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

autocar[2]

Sentiment Score[*] 84%
Reviewers from Autocar have found the following[***]:
The first electric vehicle to wear Audi Sport's coveted RS badge shares in effect all of its componentry with the Porsche Taycan. Its 83.7kWh (net capacity) battery sits between the front and rear axles, each of which houses a permanent-magnet synchronous electric motor. Combined, they endow the RS E-tron GT with system outputs of 612lb ft and 590bhp – that latter figure rising to 646bhp during launch control starts.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Super-sporty and fun to drive
  • Powerful all-wheel drive
Cons[**]
  • Not as comfortable as the Porsche Taycan Turbo

autocar[3]

Sentiment Score[*] 68%
Reviewers from Autocar have found the following[***]:
The E-tron is a big five-seater, which at 4.99m long is the same length as an Audi A6 but it's wider and much lower. There's a 93.4kWh total capacity battery with a 83.7kWh usable section, creating a 283-mile WLTP range. One motor at the rear, another at the front, four-wheel drive and a two-speed gearbox for the rear only.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Classier than the Porsche Taycan
  • Comfortable to drive
  • Lots of standard equipment
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

autocar[4]

Sentiment Score[*] 78%
Reviewers from Autocar have found the following[***]:
Audi's new electric saloon shares loads of its underpinnings with the Porsche Taycan. And it's tested here in not just one but two versions. First up is the RS E-tron GT, the 637bhp really quick version. It costs some £110,950 before options, can crack the 0-62mph sprint in 3.3 seconds and has a range of 283 miles. Then there's the (slightly) lesser E- tron GT Quattro, as powerful as a '60' Audi.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Superb electric power
  • Lots of fun to drive
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

autoexpress[5]

Sentiment Score[*] 82%
Reviewers from Autoexpress have found the following[***]:
The RS e-tron GT is the first fully electric model to wear an RS badge. It uses a 94kWh battery as standard, a two-speed gearbox, a rear locking differential and one electric motor on either axle, and develops 591bhp and 850Nm of torque. Final homologation has yet to take place but engineers are targeting a WLTP range of 250 miles on a full charge, 0-62mph in less than 3.5 seconds and top speed capped at 155mph.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Impressive acceleration
  • Impressive range of electric options
  • Unique three-chamber air suspension
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

autoexpress[6]

Sentiment Score[*] 81%
Reviewers from Autoexpress have found the following[***]:
The new e-tron GT is a landmark car from Audi, even if it is eye-wateringly expensive at just over £80,000. Powered by a 93kWh battery and a pair of electric motors, the four-wheel-drive GT might weigh as much as a Range Rover, at 2,347kg, but it generates 469bhp and 630Nm of torque. With launch control and ‘overboost’ that gives it 523bhp for 2.5 seconds, it's enough to lower its 0-62mph time from a claimed 4.5secs to 4.1secs. The way the GT drives and performance are also deeply and addictively impressive.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Class-leading electric power
  • Impressive range
  • Comfortable to drive
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

autoexpress[7]

Sentiment Score[*] 75%
Reviewers from Autoexpress have found the following[***]:
The RS e-tron GT is Audi's answer to Porsche's Taycan Turbo. With 590bhp and 830Nm of torque it makes light work of its 2,347kg kerb weight. A velvet-like touch to how it rides, smoothing the surface rather than trying to crush it into submission. There's a crispness to its controls, although the steering still has that Audi remoteness.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Brilliant electric powertrain
  • Lots of refinement
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

autoexpress[8]

Sentiment Score[*] 68%
Reviewers from Autoexpress have found the following[***]:
The e-tron GT will be Audi's third fully electric model when it launches in 18-months time. It shares its platform, called J1, with Porsche's upcoming electric vehicle, the Taycan. Audi engineers are still working on refining the overall powertrain to deliver smoother and a more relaxing drive. The chassis is still being worked on, which is a relief, because the ride quality is pretty bad.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Impressive powertrain
  • Comfortable to drive
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

carmagazine[9]

Sentiment Score[*] 63%
Reviewers from Carmagazine have found the following[***]:
The RS e-Tron GT is based on the same J1 platform as the Porsche Taycan. It has the same 800v cabling that's lighter and faster charging and uses a battery with a net capacity of 83.7kWh. Charge times will be equivalent to the Taycan, with a maximum DC charging capacity of 270kW, for a theoretical 62 miles of range in 5 minutes. The electric (natch) steering has a fixed ratio, but rear-wheel steering increases agility at lower speeds. The driving position is incredibly low, especially so considering there's a hunk of battery below your feet.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Class-leading electric power
  • Powerful all-wheel drive
  • Superb infotainment tech
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

references

  1. 1. ^ Audi E-tron GT 2021 UK review. Autocar. 2021-03-15. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  2. 2. ^ Audi RS E-tron GT 2021 review. Autocar. 2020-11-04. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  3. 3. ^ Audi RS E-tron GT 2021 UK review. Autocar. 2021-03-15. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  4. 4. ^ 2021 Audi RS E-tron GT video review: this or a Taycan?. Autocar. 2021-03-15. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  5. 5. ^ New Audi RS e-tron GT prototype review. Autoexpress. 2020-11-06. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  6. 6. ^ New Audi e-tron GT 2021 review. Autoexpress. 2021-03-15. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  7. 7. ^ New Audi RS e-tron GT 2021 review. Autoexpress. 2021-05-11. Retrieved 2021-05-13.
  8. 8. ^ New Audi e-tron GT concept review. Autoexpress. 2018-12-17. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  9. 9. ^ Audi RS e-Tron GT review: a pre-production drive. Carmagazine. 2020-11-05. Retrieved 2021-03-07.
  10. *. Neoscore is our sentiment analyzer based on natural language processing (NLP). Scaled in the range of 0 to 100, Neoscore eliminates scoring biases from each publisher; it likely differs from the publisher's own rating, if available, as a result.
  11. **. Neoanalyzer is our summarizer based on NLP. It identifies key takeaways from each third-party review. The takeaways that it produces likely differ from the publisher's own bullets points, if available, as a result.
  12. ***. Neosummarizer is based on NLP. It extracts summaries from third-party reviews. It likely that these summaries differ from the publisher's own, if available.

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