Toyota Mirai (2nd, FCB130) Review Rundown

Toyota Motor | Published on 21 Mar 2021 | Written by Dr Jiulin Teng w/ Neosummarizer

Overview

Photo of Toyota Mirai
  • Rear-wheel drive
  • No emissions in use
  • Decent fuel efficiency
  • Nothing in particular

Summary

The second-generation Mirai is Toyota's ninth FCEV. It's a zero emissions electric car, producing its electricity on board by mixing hydrogen and oxygen in a fuel cell stack, with water and heat produced as waste. The new Mirai will be more freely available when it arrives here in spring 2021, and Toyota is promising a 20% reduction in price.
This rundown provides our analysis on 8 third-party reviews. The sentiment scores, summaries, and key takeaways that we select are based on these reviews and may differ from the original publication.

Rundown

autocar[1]

Sentiment Score[*] 51%
Reviewers from Autocar have found the following[***]:
The Mirai may be a hydrogen fuel cell car, but it's only part of Toyota's ambition. This is the second Mirai but Toyota's ninth FCEV. The first Mirai, introduced in 2015, sold modestly. Around 11,000 found owners, some 180 of them in the UK.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Big enough for a five-seat car
  • Lots of space for a hydrogen fuel cell
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

carmagazine[2]

Sentiment Score[*] 72%
Reviewers from Carmagazine have found the following[***]:
Toyota is a big believer in hydrogen fuel cell cars, and we've driven the car to prove it. Compared with the first-generation Mirai from 2014, the new car's fuel cell stack is smaller but more powerful. The car's range has increased to just over 400 miles, and the vehicle is transformed from freaky Prius cousin to svelte Lexus clone.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Ethereal electric motor
  • Sleek styling
  • Decent range
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

cnet[3]

Sentiment Score[*] 68%
Reviewers from Cnet have found the following[***]:
The 2021 Toyota Mirai has a level of style and refinement you wouldn't expect for a mass-market Toyota. Toyota says the base Mirai XLE has a range of 402 miles, which represents a 30% improvement over the old car. All Mirai models get pre-collision braking with pedestrian detection, lane-departure warning with steering assist.
Find the original article here.
Pros[**]
  • Gorgeous styling
  • Superb infotainment system
  • Lots of cabin tech
Cons[**]
  • Nothing in particular

references

  1. 1. ^ Toyota Mirai 2021 UK review. Autocar. 30 November 2020. Retrieved 07 March 2021.
  2. 2. ^ New Toyota Mirai review: the second-gen hydrogen car, driven. Carmagazine. 30 November 2020. Retrieved 07 March 2021.
  3. 3. ^ 2021 Toyota Mirai first drive review: Like a hydrogen-powered Lexus. Cnet. 16 December 2020. Retrieved 07 March 2021.
  4. *. Neoscore is our sentiment analyzer based on natural language processing (NLP). Scaled in the range of 0 to 100, Neoscore eliminates scoring biases from each publisher; it likely differs from the publisher's own rating, if available, as a result.
  5. **. Neoanalyzer is our summarizer based on NLP. It identifies key takeaways from each third-party review. The takeaways that it produces likely differ from the publisher's own bullets points, if available, as a result.
  6. ***. Neosummarizer is based on NLP. It extracts summaries from third-party reviews. It likely that these summaries differ from the publisher's own, if available.

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